Ultrasonic Cleaners and How to Use Them

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Ultrasonic Metal Cleaning 0

Ultrasonic Metal Cleaning

Let’s take a look at the single most common ultrasonic cleaning application there is:

Cleaning oil and particulate off of metal parts. We help customers with this in industries as varied as carburetor cleaning to military weapons cleaning.

Here's a look at a Crest ultrasonic unit cleaning motor parts. Watch how the soil just leaps off the part:

 

Key points:

  • If your parts are heavy, make sure you invest in a perforated tray or basket. These hold their shape better than mesh. This will make a difference in the long run, and make sure you don’t damage the bottom of your tank. A perforated tray is formed from stamped metal – usually with drainage holes between 1/4″ AND 1/8″.
  • You are going to need heat. Not just because oil and other petroleum-based soils break down better with heat, but because ultrasonics are just more efficient above 140 F.
  • If you find that you need to go to the upper end of ultrasonic compatible temperatures – say 180 f – remember that someone may need to handle the part post cleaning, so worker safety will need to be taken into consideration. 
  • Temperature can also be a huge help if you require a dry part. If you have a metal part with an appreciable mass, once you pull it out of the tank you’ll see that it dries by itself.
  • The driving issues when you set up your metal cleaning process are these:

How clean is clean? It’s important to have an objective specification for what clean means. Here’s an example of an objective specification: “Viewed under 30x magnification, no more than three particles of soil per cm2  in excess of  0..50 are visible.” Here’s one that is not acceptable: “Gus down in receiving says that it is fine.”

What happens next? If I am going to coat the part with oil and store it, that’s one thing. If it is destined for anodizing, that is quite another. Let your needs drive your process, and let your process drive your equipment selection.

Here’s a good whitepaper Branson Ultrasonics did on this some years ago…
Aqueous Degreasing of Metal Parts (.pdf 1458kb)

  • Last Updated
  • David Huckabay
  • Tags: Applications

Ultrasonic Carburetor Cleaning 0

So, you’re tired of gummed up carburetors, replacing them, or at the very least paying to have them cleaned. The problem with carburetors is that they are comparatively small and very complex.

This means to clean them properly there’s a lot of dis-assembly, cleaning, and reassembly to deal with. Not to mention the risk of breaking something during cleaning! Luckily there’s an alternative to either replacing or having your carbs cleaned professionally: ultrasonic cleaning!

  • Last Updated
  • David Huckabay
  • Tags: Applications

How Much Ultrasonic Power Do I Need? 0

Today's post will take a look at one of the most commonly asked questions in ultrasonic cleaning. We'll talk about what those power specs mean, whether or not to trust them, and more.

Dear Dave,

I an trying to choose an ultrasonic cleaner, and using the power specification to compare brands. But they don’t seem to be something I can compare apples to apples. Is there a standard I can use?

Dan

Ultrasonic Gun Cleaning with the HG575! 0

So you bit the bullet, and decided to enter the world of ultrasonic firearms cleaning and re-lubrication. Thankfully you chose the best way to get started, in that you have purchased the HG575 Gun Cleaner. But now that you have it, how on earth do you use it to both clean and re-lubricate your weapons?
  • Last Updated
  • David Huckabay
  • Tags: Applications

Ultrasonic Cleaning of Injection Molds 0

cleaning injection molds with ultrasonic cleaners

Today’s discussion: an injection mold cleaning application that calls out a number of common concerns that we see with people who are trying to configure an ultrasonic cleaning system.

  • Last Updated
  • David Huckabay
  • Tags: Applications

Ultrasonic Cleaning Best Practices 0

You’ve read about them online, maybe even saw one in your local jewelry store or machine shop, and have gone out and purchased your first ultrasonic cleaner. Depending on your specific cleaning application you may have bought a small jewelry cleaner, or a complete weapons cleaning and re-lubrication system.
  • Last Updated
  • David Huckabay